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BIA HOME : CPAN Executive Committee Expels MHA

CPAN Executive Committee Expels MHA

03-Jan-2017

Lansing, Mich., January 3, 2017 – The Executive Committee of the Coalition Protecting Auto No-Fault (CPAN) voted to remove The Michigan Health and Hospital Association (MHA) from the organization. The vote was held shortly after the close of the 2016 lame duck session of the Michigan State Legislature and officially announced December 21, 2106. The vote to expel is a result of MHA collaborating with the auto insurance industry on reforms to auto no-fault that would have capped benefits for uninsured children, seniors, bicyclists, and pedestrians; cut family-provided attendant care for catastrophically injured accident victims; and created an unbalanced fraud authority funded by the auto insurance industry.

CPAN was created in 2003 solely for protecting the Michigan Auto No-Fault Law as it was originally designed and to preserve its promise that all injured auto accident victims would be guaranteed coverage for all necessary medical and rehabilitation expenses for as long as they are deemed necessary, up to and including the life of the victim. The Brain Injury association of Michigan (BIAMI) has been a staunch supporter and member of CPAN from the beginning.

“When it was first created, CPAN adopted a Statement of Principles to further define its objectives and the membership commitment that would be required of all persons and organizations who sought to join the Coalition. During the last several weeks of the lame duck legislative session, the Michigan Health and Hospital Association violated those principles and breached that commitment by actively supporting and vigorously pursuing legislation that would have stripped thousands of seriously injured accident victims of their lifetime coverage. Legislation such as this is exactly what CPAN was created to vigorously oppose. CPAN has an abiding obligation to its membership to act decisively to demonstrate that it will remain true to its principles and its mission. That is why the actions of the Michigan Health and Hospital Association cannot be ignored,” said Cornack.

While MHA’s membership in CPAN has ended, CPAN’s Executive Committee stated it would be willing to work with MHA on any auto no-fault proposals that were not inconsistent with CPAN goals and objectives.

“If anything, what happened during this lame duck session has galvanized CPAN’s membership to stay strongly united in its common commitment to find fair, long-term solutions to improving Michigan’s auto no-fault insurance system so that lifetime coverage for severely injured patients is not jeopardized,” said Cornack. He also stated that CPAN hopes MHA will take this as an opportunity to re-commit itself to the patients served by the no-fault system and act in their best interest to protect and improve this critical health care system.

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About the Brain Injury Association of Michigan

The BIAMI is dedicated to improving the lives of those affected by brain injury while reducing the incidence and impact of brain injury through education, advocacy, support, treatment services and research. Founded in 1981, the Brighton, Mich.-based BIAMI serves Michigan’s brain injury community through comprehensive educational and prevention programs. The BIAMI is the primary conduit between survivors and an extensive network of facilities, programs and professionals in the state of Michigan, which is nationally recognized as a center of excellence in brain injury treatment and rehabilitative care. The BIAMI also supports 20 statewide chapters and support groups that meet monthly. For more information, visit www.biami.org or call the toll-free helpline at (800) 444-6443.

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